You’re giving white supremacist vibes and you didn’t even know it

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Do you have a bowl haircut? Then you’re probably a white supremacist.

Own a pitbull? White supremacist, obviously.

Drink Coors? OMG 100% white supremacist.

There’s apparently dozens and dozens of random ways you could be unintentionally signaling to your friends and neighbors that you aren’t a fan of non-Caucasians — and most of them aren’t as self-explanatory as, say, the Hitler salute.  Thankfully, the Anti-Defamation League keeps a comprehensive guide called the Hate on Display™ Hate Symbols Database to help us avoid the faux pas that would get us branded as bigots and excommunicated from civilization.

This article contains arbitrary symbols which might inspire feelings of negativity or mild bemusement, but not both. Reader discretion is advised. 

Pit bulls

Pit bulls are a white supremacist’s best friend, akin to a one-year basic-tier membership in the Klan. You may as well order the dog a robe and pointy hood so you assholes will match.

Hate on Display™ Hate Symbols Database: The pit bull has long been used as a skinhead symbol, presumably because of its reputation as a “fighting” dog. Many racist skinheads and other white supremacists own or even raise pit bulls. White supremacists use one specific pit bulll graphic so often that it has become a white supremacist symbol itself. One racist skinhead group, the Keystone State Skinheads (at one time known as Keystone United) even adopted it as part of their logo.

 

 

 

H8

There’s nothing worse than hate, right?

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WRONG.

H8 is hate pickled with prejudice and seasoned with supremacy.

Don’t ever use it. Not in your text messages. Not on your license plate. Never.*

*An exception has been granted to the hundreds of famous people who scribbled it on their faces for the NOH8 campaign, which raised millions to combat H8 against the LGBTQ community. While those funds have long vanished, H8 is still going strong.

Hate on Display™ Hate Symbols Database: White supremacists use the letter/number combination H8 to mean “hate.” This usage dates back at least to the 1990s and may originally derive from the punk subculture, but it has become more common in recent years, with the spread of text-message abbreviations. Common motifs for the word include playing cards and billiards balls.

 

 

 

Bowl cut

As if we needed another reason to avoid people with bowl cuts. While a favorite of children in the 1970s, today the penis-like hairdo is mainly worn by town-dunce type characters, Hollywood starlets overestimating their sex appeal and — you guessed it — white supremacists, specifically racist school shooter Dylann Roof, whose heinous life and legacy you’re paying homage to with that hideous helmet hair.

Hate on Display™ Hate Symbols Database: After white supremacist Dylann Roof’s 2015 attack at the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina, many white supremacists tried to distance themselves from the attack or to claim it was a “false flag” operation designed to enable a crackdown on white supremacists. Since 2017, however, an increasing number of mostly younger white supremacists have not only applauded Roof’s attack but have openly promoted him as a hero, or even as a “saint.” Roof venerators often use Roof’s distinctive bowl-shaped haircut to refer to themselves and like-minded fans. This includes using word “bowl” as part of a screen name such as “Bowltrash” or “The Final Bowlution,” or collectively referring to themselves using terms such as the “Bowl Gang” or “Bowlwaffen Division.”  They may also use slang terms such as “Take the bowl pill” or “disrespect the bowl, pay the toll.” Some use phrases such as “take me to church” or “take them to church” as coded references for violence.

 

 

 

The Triforce

It’s no wonder that the source of all knowledge, courage and power in The Legend of Zelda video game series is the Ku Klux Klan. The triforce symbol, it turns out, is actually three letter K’s aligned in a triangle and facing inwards. It’s a fitting emblem for the tall, fair-haired and light-eyed protagonists of the game, who belong to a ruthless master race hellbent in their quest to subjugate monsters of color in Hyrule and slaughter their way to victory.

Hate on Display™ Hate Symbols Database: The triangular Ku Klux Klan symbol consists of what looks like a triangle within a triangle but which actually represents three letter K’s aligned in a triangle and facing inwards. This is an old Ku Klux Klan symbol that has been resurrected by modern-day Ku Klux Klan groups. A variation on this symbol has the K’s facing outwards instead of inwards.

 

 

Skull and crossbones

The skull and crossbones is worn as a badge of bigotry by a diverse field of contemporary evildoers like tattoo artists and motorcycle enthusiasts, but it’s universally associated with pirates (i.e. racists) and those who’ve followed in their racist footsteps. Membership in the so-called “Goonies” — the Pacific Northwest’s most feared juvenile crime ring, notorious for destroying a legendary archaeological site and looting its priceless treasure — is strictly limited to white and Asian males.

Hate on Display™ Hate Symbols Database: “Totenkopf” is German for “death’s head” or skull and typically refers to a skull-and-crossbones image.  During the Nazi era, Hitler’s Schutzstaffel (SS) adopted one particular Totenkopf image as a symbol.  Among other uses, it became the symbol of the SS-Totenkopfverbande (one of the original three branches of the SS, along with the Algemeine SS and the Waffen SS), whose purpose was to guard the concentration camps.  Many original members of this organization were later transferred into and became the core of a  Waffen SS division, the 3rd SS “Totenkopf” Panzer Division, which engaged in a number of war crimes during World War II. Following the war, neo-Nazis and other white supremacists resurrected the Totenkopf as a hate symbol because of its importance to the SS and it has been a common hate symbol since.  It is this particular image of a skull and crossbones that is considered a hate symbol, not any image of a skull and crossbones.

 

 

 

Coors

Coors was the surname of the lowly brewery apprentice who founded the eponymous beer empire in the mid-19th century. Today it’s mainly recognized as an acronym for “Comrades of our Racial Struggle,” which is the white supremacist group people who drink Coors are showing support for. Now let me swap out that Coors for a nice, cold  Bud Light.

Hate on Display™ Hate Symbols Database: COORS Family Skins (the word COORS is an acronym for “Comrades of our Racial Struggle”) is a racist skinhead group whose members are primarily based in southern California. They use a logo consisting of an Othala rune combined with a runic symbol, but they also occasionally appropriate the logo for Coors Beer.

 

 

(((  ))) a.k.a. Echo

There’s a reason you shouldn’t use too many parentheses, and it may not be what you think (it’s racist). Using three sets of parentheses around a person’s name (((like this))) is how antisemites indicate that the person is Jewish (see example below).

WHITE SUPREMACISTS WRITE: (((Jesus)))

WHITE AND/OR NON-WHITE NON-SUPREMACISTS WRITE: Jesus (a Jew)

So do not use six parentheses (or three pairs) ever anywhere.

If you need to nest phrases within phrases (such as this [example] phrase), first use single parentheses (four [4] total) then single brackets ([ and ]), then double parentheses (as [you ((can)) see] here), then (two pairs of) parenthesis/bracket/parenthesis combos ([(like this)]) but NEVER triple parentheses (((like this [[[triple brackets also bad]]]))). Alternate the pattern with every additional level of nesting.])])))])) Got it?

Hate on Display™ Hate Symbols Database:  Multiple parentheses—or the “echo,” as it is sometimes referred to—is a typographical practice used by some antisemites online.  It typically consists of three pairs of parentheses or brackets used around someone’s name or around a term or phrase. When used around someone’s name—such as (((Natalie Weiss)))—it is intended by the user to indicate to others “in the know” that the person being referred to is Jewish.  When used around a term or phrase—such as (((banker)))—the intent is generally that the word “Jewish” be placed in front of the term or phrase, or simply that the term or phrase is actually synonymous with Jews. Journalists Cooper Fleishman and Anthony Smith traced the origins of this antisemitic typographical symbol to a 2014 podcast that used an audio echo as a sound effect when someone on the podcast mentioned a Jewish name.  Other antisemites translated the audio echo into a typographical symbol used primarily on social media sites such as Twitter. The use of the echo was relatively uncommon, but in the spring of 2016, some antisemites began using the echo when responding to or re-tweeting Jewish journalists, or journalists thought to be Jewish, which brought more attention to the practice.The publicity generated by news coverage of the symbol resulted in a much larger counter-use of the echo, as thousands of anti-hate activists and others began changing their Twitter screen names to echo themselves in an “I am Spartacus” fashion.  Others used inverted parentheses—such as )))Jane Doe(((—for the same purpose. Following this, some antisemites began using inverted parentheses themselves, on their own screen names, to indicate that they were not Jewish or were anti-Jewish.  This use of the inverted parentheses has become more common.

 

 

The numbers 2, 6, 12, 13, 14, 16, 18, 21, 23, 28, 33, 38, 43, 52, 83, 88, 90,109, 110, 311, 318, 511 and 737 

All of these numbers are calling cards for white supremacists and should be avoided like the plague. Don’t use them in your PINs, your team jersey numbers or on your lotto tickets.

 

WEHOville condemns beliefs of racial superiority and is committed to fighting racial injustice in all its forms. This article contains fictional elements and is intended as satire. Please do not take its contents literally or personally. 

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Mike
Mike
4 months ago

They do most of the crime,then call you a racist,when you acknowledge it !

David
David
4 months ago

It’s definitely satire. I just don’t know who the target audience is in this piece. I didn’t learn anything. I doubt if anyone who reads this falls into the demographic that probably believes any of it anyway.

tired of OLD weho
tired of OLD weho
3 months ago
Reply to  David

cause it’ an AI written article that is space filler, and COMMON for this site

#blueyedboy
#blueyedboy
4 months ago

Enjoyed this. Imagine some dufus paid thousands at a university to hear some overpaid prof pitch the White Supremacist claptrap. Confirming I am not a supremacist, just a WASP elitist.

:dpb
:dpb
4 months ago

Is this satire? It’s dangerous. Also a horrible way to marginalize people. Coming from an organization that claims to be above the fray, it’s not funny and it’s damaging. I can give you concrete examples of good non-white supremacist that fall into these beer drinker, pet owner, hair cut challenged categories. Not a good post by Wehoville. I’m disappointed this was published.

C'mon Sense
C'mon Sense
4 months ago
Reply to  :dpb

Agreed. We are all well versed at this point in the atrocities of the past. It’s far time to move past them and build community. I do not like seeing articles like this in Wehoville. Just sayin’

West
West
4 months ago
Reply to  :dpb

Definitely satire

john
john
4 months ago
Reply to  :dpb

You can tell you are so far left because you don’t realize that cancel culture calls everything racist or white supremacy. Biden says it is the greatest threat to America…and CA schools make the SAT optional…why…because it is racist. The post is making fun of this silly notion that everything is white supremacy if the far left doesn’t agree with it.

:dpb
:dpb
4 months ago
Reply to  john

And it doesn’t below here. Good bye.

BloodshotEyedGuy
BloodshotEyedGuy
4 months ago

I started to suspect that I might be a “white supremacist” right after the first time I heard Kid Rock and immediately knew he is one of the greatest modern-rock artists out there. Or maybe it was when I started wearing white tank tops after seeing “Rocky” at age 10. Could have been that time I bought an “Italians Do It Better” t-shirt after seeing Madonna sporting one in a music video. But I’m also confused, because I probably attended more Donna Summer concerts than the average gay man has a right to.

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