Storm hammers WeHo and all of Southern California

ADVERTISEMENT

California is grappling with a severe storm that has unleashed howling winds and heavy rainfall across the state, prompting evacuations, widespread power outages, and a state of emergency in eight counties. The storm, intensified by an atmospheric river drawing in moisture from the Pacific Ocean, is expected to stall over the Los Angeles region, bringing prolonged and significant precipitation to the area, heightening the risk of flash flooding and mudslides.

In Los Angeles County alone, over 850,000 customers have lost power due to the storm’s ferocity, with the National Weather Service issuing a flash flood warning until midnight Pacific time. This warning encompasses Downtown Los Angeles, spotlighting the severity of the conditions even as the Grammy Awards proceeded. Forecasters predict an additional two to five inches of rain could fall in the area, raising the stakes for emergency response and rescue operations.

The situation in Santa Barbara County has grown increasingly dire, with evacuations ordered near waterways and state campgrounds due to rapidly rising waters, especially around Mission Creek. Police officers have resorted to door-to-door warnings to urge residents to evacuate. Similarly, evacuations have been mandated in the La Tuna Canyon Road area and the northern portion of Topanga Canyon in Los Angeles County, as well as unincorporated parts of Ojai, reflecting the widespread impact of the storm across the region.

The coastal area between Los Angeles and Santa Barbara is bracing for potentially an inch of rainfall per hour, totaling up to eight inches over a 24-hour period. Northern California has not been spared, with San Francisco experiencing blocked thoroughfares due to fallen trees and nearby mountains recording wind gusts up to 88 miles per hour, equivalent to a Category 1 hurricane.

Governor Gavin Newsom has declared a state of emergency for Los Angeles, San Bernardino, San Diego, and other Southern California counties, mobilizing the state National Guard for emergency response. This declaration underscores the storm’s severity and the potential for life-threatening impacts, urging residents to heed emergency orders and alerts.

ADVERTISEMENT

Despite the challenging conditions, Los Angeles Unified School District has decided to keep schools open on Monday, citing the importance of providing nutrition to students. Superintendent Alberto Carvalho highlighted the district’s readiness to adapt plans based on shifting conditions, with updates scheduled for district employees and parents. Vinedale College Preparatory Academy in Sun Valley, under an evacuation warning, will close, illustrating the localized decisions being made in response to the storm.

The atmospheric river powering the storm underscores the critical challenges posed by such weather phenomena, particularly in terms of flooding and the potential for landslides in areas already saturated by previous rainfall. Communities near burn scars and those prone to floods and slides are under evacuation warnings and orders, as emergency services and officials work tirelessly to mitigate the impact and ensure public safety.

0 0 votes
Article Rating
ADVERTISEMENT

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

8 Comments
Newest
Oldest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Malibu boy
Malibu boy
21 days ago

Okay fine, i canceled my daily walks. Now stop with the doom and gloom.

Cy Husain
21 days ago
Reply to  Malibu boy

More like we need to actively STOP the cause of the doom and gloom, before it stops us permanently ❗ 😱

Cy Husain
21 days ago

The worse is yet to come in years ahead, boosting the energy (heat in this case) of a dynamic system and crossing a threshold, produces chaos. Anthropogenic Climate Change increases storm potency, as a warmer atmosphere can absorb more water vapor, giving storms capacity to deliver more extreme precipitation. Off coast, rising sea levels (thermal expansion of water & glacial melting) due to global warming cause waves to be bigger, increasing erosion rates & contributing to rising tides. West Hollywood may likely be under sea water before the 22nd Century ❗

Malibu boy
Malibu boy
21 days ago
Reply to  Cy Husain

Oh come on, look around, we have much more serious things to worry about in the future than global warming. Crime, fraud, greed, overcrowding and liberal leadership are the real problems.

Cy Husain
21 days ago
Reply to  Malibu boy

The possibilities of worldwide nuclear war or effects of anthropogenic climate change also known as global warming, carry the greatest potential for bringing about human extinction than just about anything else ❗

Harambe's Vengeful Ghost
Harambe's Vengeful Ghost
21 days ago

Good, maybe it’ll clean up all the filth and detritus and we can elect a city council made up of Americans and not worry about our dogs getting stolen at the park or seeing hobos jack off on the street.

Single Guy WeHo
Single Guy WeHo
21 days ago

you could stand outside and supervise. oops, you’ll get carried away too!

hifi5000
hifi5000
22 days ago

The northern part of West Hollywood which includes the Sunset Strip is hilly,so I would expect some flooding to occur there.Hopefully,the city has cleared out the storm drains to handle all the water.

8
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x