WeHo Hosts Aging in Place Forum on Saturday

ADVERTISEMENT

West Hollywood’s Human Services Commission will host a discussion on Saturday on ways to help residents remain in their homes as they age.

senior-citizensThe city is developing a five-year strategic plan on “aging in place.” It will build on existing policies and programs, such as arts and cultural events, develop “lifespan-friendly” housing, senior services and approaches to wellness. The strategic plan responds to a demographic trend — people are living longer and staying independently in their homes for years more than in the past. The strategic plan will provide a comprehensive review of services available for seniors in and around West Hollywood, and it will analyze gaps and barriers to aging in the community.

The discussion will solicit ideas around issues and themes such as open spaces and buildings, transportation, respect and social inclusion, housing and communications and information, among others. There will also be time set aside to gather ideas outside of these categories.

West Hollywood is home to a large number of seniors. Approximately 15 percent of the city’s population is senior, compared with 11 percent in Los Angeles County. The city has a long history of providing services and programs for seniors that help older people to continue aging in place. In a 2013 survey of the community in West Hollywood, 86 percent of seniors reported that their quality of life is excellent or good.

The aging in place discussion will take place from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the West Hollywood Park Auditorium, 647 N. San Vicente Blvd. south of Santa Monica. Lunch will be provided, and an Innovations Café will follow from 12:30 to 2 p.m. Validated parking will be available in the five-story parking structure.

For more information about the Human Services Commission special meeting on Aging in Place or to RSVP, please contact Jeff Book at jbook@weho.org or at (323) 848-6471. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, please call TTY (323) 848-6496.

ADVERTISEMENT
0 0 votes
Article Rating
ADVERTISEMENT

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

7 Comments
Newest
Oldest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Virginia Gillick
Virginia Gillick
9 years ago

I think that the information about “affordable” housing is not easy to find and/or understand. There are cut off lines for income and many people I know are making too much for low income which is less than $20,000 (I think) and not enough for the next level up which is roughly $40,000+. I do not have the exact figures right this minute. But then, it all seems to be a moot point because the wait lists seem to be closed all the time. Another confusing aspect is that most of these housing units are available to all in L.A.… Read more »

joetheplummber
joetheplummber
9 years ago

@Disco. If you were Ellised (as friends of ours were) and you qualify, then you go to the top of the list for an affordable unit–did you know this? Check with the City. Hopefully by April of next year there will be more units on line for people like you. I know many people say that we have too much affordable housing, but my wife and I will think positive thoughts that you will get a unit in West Hollywood.

Disco Dan
Disco Dan
9 years ago

My landlord recently used the dreaded Ellis Act evicting me from my apartment by April of next year just five days shy of my 72nd birthday and after having lived in my apartment (by then) for over 37 years. This is a truly disgusting and appalling piece of legislation which, incredibly, also would affect someone who is terminally ill. It is the Elephant in the Room that, unfortunately, is never spoken about or even addressed. Some people I’ve met are not even aware of the Ellis Act !!!

Gail
Gail
9 years ago

As a homeowner in Weho I am looking forward to participating in this discussion. I want to continue to thrive in this wonderful city. Thanks for doing this.

jimmypalmieri
jimmypalmieri
9 years ago

It is truly sad when a council member dissolves all hope of people ever getting into an affordable/inclusionary housing unit. Sometimes I am left speechless by what is said.

Isa
Isa
9 years ago

Unable to make it Sat. Want to retire in place.

joetheplummber
joetheplummber
9 years ago

The most important thing the City could do is identify it’s Senior population that are in Rent Controlled Units and then determine if they are or will be eligible for affordable housing. This would be like financial planning for low-income Seniors. Two of our current Councilmembers apparently think we don’t need anymore affordable housing–this is sad! We need to identify our “at risk” Seniors and develop a policy to place them into affordable housing with services to ensure their buildings are not eventually “retired.” By doing this we would help those Seniors and alleviate the risk of Building’s being Ellised.… Read more »

7
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x